Does power output vary accordingly with high load resistance training? - A comparative study between Bulk-up and Strength-up resistance training

Keisuke Shibata, Kazuki Takizawa, Masao Mizuno

Abstract


The objective of this study is to investigate the effects of six weeks of high-intensity resistance training on the power output of 14 university basketball players. The subjects were randomly divided into two groups: a hypertrophy-oriented group (bulk-up) and a neuromuscular improvement oriented-group (strength-up). The bulk-up group performed three sets of squat exercises at 75% of 1RM with 10 repetitions and 1-minute rest period between sets. The strength-up group performed six sets of squat exercises at 90% of 1RM with four repetitions and 3-minute rest period between sets. Both groups performed the squat exercises twice a week over a period of six weeks. The one repetition maximum (1RM) and muscle power of the squat were measured before training (0-wk), after three weeks of training (3-wk), and after six weeks of training (6-wk). The thigh circumference of each subject was measured at 0-wk and 6-wk. It is found that the 1RM of the squat increases significantly after the training period for both groups, and the rate of improvement does not differ between the groups at 6-wk (bulk-up group: 13.1 ± 9.3%, strength-up group: 12.6 ± 6.3%). It is also found that there is a significant increase in the thigh circumference (p < 0.01) in the left leg for the bulk-up group. In contrast, there is a significant increase in the peak muscle power (POWmax) (p < 0.05) for the strength-up group. The rate of increase for POWmax is different even after three weeks of training (bulk-up group: -4.5 ± 9.6%, strength-up group: 13.9 ± 13.6%). The results suggest that the effects of resistance training on the power output and thigh circumference vary according to the training programme even if the total work load remains the same. It is recommended that strength-up resistance training is implemented to increase muscle power. 


Keywords


Squat, power, 1RM, hypertrophy, neuromuscular improvement, periodization

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References


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DOI: https://doi.org/10.15282/mohe.v4i2.30